Ceiling Buttons & Plaster Washers

Ceiling Button / Plaster Washer / Plaster Button / Ceiling Washer

 

Ceiling Buttons / Plaster Washers / Plaster Buttons / Ceiling Washers

Please visit our shopping cart to purchase these: Plaster Washers/Ceiling Buttons

FOR PERFECT PLASTER REPAIR JOBS.

These are the solution to sagging, cracking plaster!

Great For either the ceiling or wall!

We Carry the 1″ sized washers

 

Plaster washers are about the size of a quarter and cost pennies. A drywall
screw goes through the washer and is driven into the wood lath behind the
plaster. The unique design of the plaster washers anchors the plaster firmly
against the lath, stopping cracks and sagging.

Why Plaster Washers?

The old houses we love and live in are almost all distinguished by the pervasive use of plasterwork. Real
plaster has a look, feel, acoustic properties and often rich decorative detail that just can’t be copied by
its modern cost cutting substitute–paper-faced, gypsum-filled wallboard, or drywall. Houses move and
breathe, however, much like humans, and over time can develop cracks in the walls and ceilings. In these
areas, the layers of plaster are pulling away from the underlying strips of wood lath which support it.
No problem! Plaster work is easy to repair, even for the novice, with the a few simple tools
and materials. A plaster surface is composed of three or more coats of plaster secured to lath. In turn the
lath is fastened to the house’s framing.

We have the solution to sagging, cracking plaster!

Plaster washers are about the size of a quarter and cost pennies. A drywall screw goes through the washer and is driven into the wood lath behind the plaster. The unique design of the plaster washers anchors the plaster firmly against the lath, stopping cracks and sagging.

Why Plaster Washers?

The old houses we love and live in are almost all distinguished by the pervasive use of plasterwork. Real plaster has a look, feel, acoustic properties and often rich decorative detail that just can’t be copied by its modern cost cutting substitute–paper-faced, gypsum-filled wallboard, or drywall.

Houses move and breathe, however, much like humans, and over time can develop cracks in the walls and ceilings. In these areas, the layers of plaster are pulling away from the underlying strips of wood lath which support it. No problem! Plaster work is easy to repair, even for the novice, with the a few simple tools, materials and our plaster washers!

Materials for typical plaster repair projects:

  • plaster washers
  • 1-5/8″ galvanized drywall screws
  • patching plaster
  • self-stick fiberglass mesh drywall tape
  • ready-mix drywall (joint) compound
  • drywall sanding screen or sandpaper

And these are the tools you’ll need:

  • a stiff, narrow paint scraper or old chisel
  • a #2 screw driving bit
  • a variable speed drill or screw gun (cordless is the most convenient)
  • safety glasses
  • dust mask
  • an old paint brush
  • an old container and stir stick for mixing patching plaster
  • a 6″ drywall taping knife
  • drywall sander or sanding block

Known as Ceiling Buttons or Plaster Washers.
Used to hold up sagging ceilings.
Countersunk in the middle for a drywall screw.
Perforated to hold spackling to hide repair.

  • 1 ” Plaster Repair Washer
  • Secures sagging or cracked interior or exterior plaster to stabilize and support repairs
  • Galvanized-Coated Steel
  • Unique, round plate design with the outside circumference beveled toward the work surface
  • Twenty smaller outer holes provide bonding of plaster to washer face

1″ Plaster Repair Washers most common use is to stabilize and re-support the sagging old plaster, which is separating and cracking. (Many plaster walls have lead paint or asbestos issues and need to be recoated rather than removed). The shape and design differs from other plaster washers in that the edges taper down toward the work area for an improved perimeter bearing pressure. A bugle head screw (typically a drywall screw) will flush down for minimum profile. Commonly used sized of drywall screw would be a minimum of 1 5/8″ or 2″.

Instructions

Step 1:

Remove any small, loose chunks of plaster. Reattach remaining loose plaster with plaster washers, spaced a few inches apart. To avoid cracking the plaster, drill pilot holes for the screws with a 1/8-in.-diam., carbide-tipped masonry bit. For large loose areas, install the washers in concentric rings, starting where the plaster is firmly attached and working in toward the loosest area in the middle.

To secure loose plaster along cracks, install the screws on both sides and about an inch away from the crack.

Step 2:

Mist the area with water first to prevent the dry plaster and wood from drawing moisture out of the compound too quickly. Fill small holes with a setting-type joint compound (a powder that must be mixed with water) to almost level it with the surrounding area. Use a 5-inch taping knife to apply the compound in two stages, scratching the surface of the first coat so the next coat will bond better. For larger holes, cut a scrap of 3/8-in. or 1/2-in. drywall to fit the hole and fasten it with screws to the lath, then cover it with compound.

Mix the compound with water using a potato masher. It works well and cleans easily if you wash it off right away.

Step 3:

After the patch dries, apply self-adhering Fiberglass reinforcing tape over the patched area and all cracks. Avoid overlapping the pieces of tape. Or you may embed paper drywall reinforcing tape in the compound immediately after applying it, and smooth with the taping knife.

Step 4:

Apply two or three additional coats of compound, allowing complete drying between coats and feathering each coat over a wider area than the preceding one. Drying time varies according to the type of compound as well as with the humidity and the amount of ventilation.

Step 5:

Use a pole sander, as shown, or a similar pad sander, with very fine (150-grit) sandpaper to smooth the compound after it has dried. (Compound will turn from gray when it’s wet to bright white when it’s dry.)